What to measure from plants in predator exclosure studies?

Insectivorous birds and bats help plants by removing herbivorous arthropods. Predator exclosures around the plants are needed to study this. What could be measured of the plants inside the exclosures and in uncaged controls? There are several possibilities that are listed in this post. There is need for more plant measurements in predator exclosure studies, especially in the natural tropical forests.

Ecologist Spotlight: Anna Carter

Welcome to the Ecologist Spotlight column! We seek out ecologists with diverse backgrounds and perspectives to highlight their work and share their stories and experiences. Thank you to Anna Carter for participating in our […]

Let’s talk career paths

Career paths in academia too often take a linear trajectory, especially in ecology. This post
explores how they impact equality and diversity in our field and why we should start a conversation about it with the aim to change this.

Changing the model of academic publication

The problems with academia are multifaceted. The intense competition for positions and funding rewards numbers of publications and grant dollars brought in, rather than advances in understanding. Individual researchers cannot change this state of affairs without uniting to improve the system. While many issues need to be addressed, there is one revolution that researchers can start immediately: we can change the model of academic publication.

Let’s not reintroduce species for conservation, let’s repatriate species

Recovery of imperilled species requires a diverse set of conservation strategies. One strategy, known as species reintroductions, is to release individuals to areas where they historically resided but have recently been extirpated. Here, we contend that the term repatriation should be used in lieu of reintroduction to enhance clarity when discussing conservation initiatives.

How I work

“How I Work” interviews demonstrate that there are many ways to be successful in academia and students, post-docs, and professors need to find the approach that is best for them.

Celebrating women role models in ecology

We are all influenced by researchers as we navigate the world of STEM. There are negative interactions that make us question our decision to pursue research, but it is the positive interactions and the encouragement of a few that we would like to highlight on International Women’s Day. In this post, we want to thank and celebrate some of the women in ecology that have welcomed us into this field, encouraged us to pursue careers in ecology, and guided us to success.

We should study the nutritional ecology of wild bees (to be bee friendly)

Changes in bee habitat floral composition shape the available nutritional supply in the environment. In this context, the key plant species must be present in the flora to produce pollen that is nutritionally balanced for bees. Lack of nutritionally balanced food results in limitation posed on the growth and development of bees, negatively influencing their populations. Improved understanding of impacts of taxonomically diverse floral resources on bees is needed for better understanding of pollinator decline and may result in more successful intervention strategies.

Our environment reflects our policies

As scientists contemplate our role in communicating science to policy makers, we often forget the myriad ways that policy impacts our science and the systems we study. Every field site, ecosystem, and landscape in which we work reflects the legacy of international treaties, national and state laws, and land use programs. Our discussions regarding whether and how we engage in the policy process should reflect an awareness of the many ways that these policies drive what we see and do every day in our research.